Why your thyroid wants you to eat more seaweed [and a salad recipe you'll love]

Arame Seaweed Salad: loaded with iodine and a great lunch addition
Arame Seaweed Salad: loaded with iodine and a great lunch addition

If you knew that there was a food that was loaded with valuable nutrition 

for your thyroid, would you run out and grab some?

Sea vegetables (with exotic names like kombu, nori, and arame)

are a hot ticket to hormonal success.

Ounce for ounce, seaweeds are chock full of nutrition, including calcium, iron and B-vitamins that can help rev up metabolism. But the best part about seaweed is that they’re mineral dense, with 10 to 20 times the minerals of land plants.

Although they may not sound as warm and fuzzy as vitamins, minerals perform critical functions, acting as spark plugs for your body.

In fact, all nutrients—vitamins, proteins, enzymes, amino acids, carbs, fats—need minerals to help them do their jobs inside the body.

Minerals are necessary to build healthy bones, produce hormones, and transfer nutrients across cell membranes. Enzymes just won’t work without the presence of key minerals.

Minerals are not something that your body can make, so you have to get them in your food grown in proper soils. Essentially, minerals come from the earth.

Healthy soil is about 45% mineral rich.

Unfortunately, our modern farming practices have taken a toll. Based on a study done in 1992, U.S. soils contain 86% less minerals than they did 100 years ago.

Even if you’re eating a well balanced diet, your body could probably use a mineral boost.

Seaweeds are the answer. They’re loaded with iodine (aka, the thyroid mineral), calcium, magnesium and iron.

In Chinese Medicine and other natural healing modalities, there’s a very cool theory called the Doctrine of Signatures, which states that an herb or a plant serves the body in much the same way that the plant acts in its natural environment.

Here’s what I mean: Seaweeds are transformers. They are the magical plants of the ocean.

In Healing with Whole Foods, Paul Pitchford writes, “wherever seaweeds grow, they do not simply absorb and concentrate toxins. Rather they detoxify and transform a certain amount of toxic metals, converting them to harmless salts, which the body excretes through the intestines.”

This is exactly what seaweeds do in our bodies.

Seaweed consumption is known to soften hardened areas and masses (think fibroids, nodules or cystic tissues), and detoxify the body. Most likely due to their high mineral content, eating seaweed tends to get things moving in your body and kick biochemical reactions into gear.

Your thyroid needs iodine to be able to make thyroid hormone. So if your hair is getting a little thin, or you’d like to slim down just a bit, it’s a great idea to add foods like my favorite Arame Seaweed Salad (recipe below).

Arame has a subtle, semi-sweet flavor and firm texture. Most people find it to be quite tasty and easy to work with. This salad is a snap to make and it gets even better the next day. If you’re not a fan of the seaweed flavor, you can always tone it down a bit by serving it over a light bed of greens, such as Romaine leaves.

Now, I love hearing from you, seaweed fan or not. Tell me in the comments below, do you mix sea veggies into your cooking? If so, what’s your favorite veggie of the sea and how do you prefer to prepare it? And, if you haven’t dipped into seaweeds yet, what sort of recipe would you like to try?

~ Kristin